Venture capital for biotechnology entrepreneurship in South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Johnstone-Robertson, Jason M
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-01T13:27:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-01T13:27:13Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/27872
dc.description Wits Business School March 2017 en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Biotechnology, especially in terms of the third generation applications found in medicine and genetic modification, is expected to be a significant contributor to national economies globally, with both the developed and developing world seeking solutions to properly create and support their own industries. The primary method found is the establishment of entrepreneurial enterprises with the support of local funding sources such as Venture Capitalists and government policies. This study explores the current environment of the biotechnology sector in South Africa with regard to Venture Capitalists and the potential mechanisms found that assist business survival from startup to maturity. In-depth semi-structured interviews involving entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, representatives of grant giving organisations and academics were used to generate views of the current state of the South African sector. The main findings derived from content analysis were that South Africa’s current ability to support Biotechnology entrepreneurs has been impacted by lack of available funding and confidence in the various mechanisms currently in place. This was found to be due to inconsistent policies and mismanagement at various levels of funding and support. In addition, South African venture capitalists currently lacked the knowledge and skills to properly understand the needs of the biotechnology business, with potential entrepreneurs lacking sufficient skills and knowledge to properly approach and develop their business ventures. This was especially the case in regards to the development and investment times required in the sector. The skills in the economic and academic sectors are sound, however cross-disciplinary individuals, with skills in business and science, are lacking who are capable of generating viable products for the market from research generated from South Africa’s biotechnology academic strengths. However, there is constant improvement, with many respondents hopeful of the sector’s future en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.title Venture capital for biotechnology entrepreneurship in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dc.description.librarian MT 2019 en_ZA


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