The rise of Afrikanerdom as an immanent critique of Marx's Theory of Social Class

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dc.contributor.author Moodie, Dunbar
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-29T09:37:04Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-29T09:37:04Z
dc.date.issued 1975-08
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/10258
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented October 1975 en_US
dc.description.abstract For Marx, social classes are groups which arise in the course of the division of labour. Based on developments in the forces of production, class formation leads to inevitable conflict, as a result of which one class comes to dominate all others. Class is thus an identifiable historical actuality; an objective phenomenon, rooted in the relations of production. This is what Marx calls "class-in-itself". However precise its actuality in the relations of production, however, the reality of a class-in-itself is obscured by false consciousness. It must achieve true consciousness to become a "class-for-itself". en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries African Studies Institute;ISS 479
dc.subject Africa, Southern. Race relations en_US
dc.subject Africa, Southern. Economic conditions en_US
dc.subject Africa, Southern. Social conditions en_US
dc.title The rise of Afrikanerdom as an immanent critique of Marx's Theory of Social Class en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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