The iconology of Women's paraphernalia among the Ntwane.

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dc.contributor.author Friedman, Hazel Deborah
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-03T08:54:04Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-03T08:54:04Z
dc.date.issued 1992
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/24708
dc.description A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of Arts, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, for the Degree of Master of Arts. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This dissertation is a study of the iconology of paraphernalia produced by women, among the Ntwane. It represents the culmination of primary field research into the matelial culture of this group, as well as supplementary research conducted at the Africana Museum in Johannesburg, the South African Museum in Cape Town, the National Museumin B1u~!mfontein and the Duggan-Cronin Museumin Kimberley. My investigative methods consisted of unstructured interviews with both married and unmarried members of the Ntwane community at :Kwarrielaagte. Although the focus of my research was primarily on paraphernaIia produced and worn by women, I also interviewed Ntwane men in order to obtain a variety of interpretations and opinions as to the 'meanings' of the objects and traditions under analysis. In addition to the above mentioned field work and gallery research, I consulted a wide range of literature on critical theories, auch as marxism, structuralism end paststructuralism, 141 order to supplement my methodological approach to the iconology of women's art among the Ntwane. It also referred to literature on a number of traditional South. African groups, such as the Pedi and Ndebele. in order to identify the cross-cultural influ8nces between these groups and the Ntwane. The literature on these closely related However, this definition constitutes a gross oversimplification of the concept, for it doe) not allow for a shift in aesthetic criteria from culture to culture. It establishes the concept 'aesthetic' as an absolute, whereas in actuality, it is a value-laden term, whose problems of definition are exacerbated '.men attempting cross cultural research. It is therefore necessary at the outset of this dissertation to formulate a working definition of 'aesthetics' within the context of the Ntwane. It is suggeuted that the aesthetic componsnts of Ntwane objects include style. technique and medium, but extend beyond their formal qualities into activities such as ritual and custom. The socio-cultural activities performed by the Ntwane may be regarded as intrinsically significant to the formal characteristics of their paraphernalia. It may therefore be argued that their objects are the concrete. tangible manifestations of a set of underlying constructs. expressed in adherence to particular conventions of representation; furthermore, that the reduction of the aesthetic component of Ntwane objects to merely an ase ssment; of their formal criteria, would constitute an impoverishment of their levels of meaning. A formalist approach to the art of Ntwane women also fails to consider issues of change in the form and function of their paraphernalia and the effects of broader social transformations on the material culture of the Ntwane. Chapter One of my dissertation will comprise a brief survey of the literature on the Ntwane. In addition to identifying the existing information, methodological gaps in the literature will be mentioned. It is the partial aim of this dissertation to "fill in" some of the gaps by groups helped to shed light on signitficant aspects of Ntwane material culture, which in turn, provided me with greater insight into the iconology of their paraphernalia. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.subject SOTHO (AFRICAN PEOPLE)--SOCIAL LIFE AND CUSTOMS. en_ZA
dc.subject PEDI (AFRICAN PEOPLE)--SOCIAL LIFE AND CUSTOMS. en_ZA
dc.subject NTWANE (AFRICAN PEOPLE)--SOCIAL LIFE AND CUSTOMS. en_ZA
dc.subject MOUTSE (SOUTH AFRICA)--SOCIAL CONDITIONS. en_ZA
dc.subject ART AND SOCIETY--SOUTH AFRICA--MOUTSE. en_ZA
dc.subject WOMEN--SOUTH AFRICA--MOUTSE. en_ZA
dc.subject ART, BLACK--SOUTH AFRICA--MOUTSE. en_ZA
dc.title The iconology of Women's paraphernalia among the Ntwane. en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dc.description.librarian Andrew Chakane 2018 en_ZA


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