The Neo-Colonial Political Economy of Scholarly Publishing: Its UK-US Origins, Maxwell’s Role, and Implications for Sub-Saharan Africa

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dc.contributor.author Gray, Eve
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-31T21:19:39Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-31T21:19:39Z
dc.date.issued 2021-05-31
dc.identifier.citation Gray, E. (2021). The neo-colonial political economy of scholarly publishing: Its UK-US origins, Maxwell’s role, and implications for sub-Saharan Africa. The African Journal of Information and Communication (AJIC), 27, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.23962/10539/31367 en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 2077-7213 (online version)
dc.identifier.issn 2077-7205 (print version)
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/31367
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.23962/10539/31367
dc.description.abstract The prevailing dynamics of today’s global scholarly publishing ecosystem were largely established by UK and US publishing interests in the years immediately after the Second World War. With a central role played by publisher Robert Maxwell, the two nations that emerged victorious from the war were able to dilute the power of German-language academic publishing—dominant before the war—and bring English-language scholarship, and in particular English-language journals, to the fore. Driven by intertwined nationalist, commercial, and technological ambitions, English-language academic journals and impact metrics gained preeminence through narratives grounded in ideas of “global” reach and values of “excellence”—while “local” scholarly publishing in sub-Saharan Africa, as in much of the developing world, was marginalised. These dynamics established in the post-war era still largely hold true today, and need to be dismantled in the interests of more equitable global scholarship and socio-economic development. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher LINK Centre, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg en_ZA
dc.subject scholarly publishing, academic journals, global science, universities, colonialism, decolonisation, impact metrics, distribution rights, copyright, fair use, fair dealing, Robert Maxwell, UK, US, sub-Saharan Africa, South Africa en_ZA
dc.title The Neo-Colonial Political Economy of Scholarly Publishing: Its UK-US Origins, Maxwell’s Role, and Implications for Sub-Saharan Africa en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA
dc.journal.title The African Journal of Information and Communication (AJIC) en_ZA
dataset.nrf.grant
dc.description.librarian CA2021 en_ZA
dc.citation.doi https://doi.org/10.23962/10539/31367 en_ZA
dc.orcid.id https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2176-0143 en_ZA
dc.journal.link http://www.wits.ac.za/linkcentre/ajic en_ZA
dc.journal.issue 27 en_ZA
dc.article.start-page 1 en_ZA
dc.article.end-page 9 en_ZA
dc.faculty Humanities en_ZA
dc.school School of Literature, Language and Media (SLLM) en_ZA


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  • AJIC Issue 27, 2021
    Articles on problematic internet use, Indigenous knowledge in vocational education, machine learning, scaling of innovation, institutional isomorphism, human–computer interaction for development, and scholarly publishing.

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