Sub-imperialism, primitive acculumation, and state formation: The making of a Boer Republic

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dc.contributor.author Keegan, Timothy
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-14T09:43:52Z
dc.date.available 2011-02-14T09:43:52Z
dc.date.issued 1987-03-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/9021
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented 23 March 1987 en_US
dc.description.abstract This paper focuses on colonial economy and society in the crucial but recently neglected middle years of the Nineteenth century, on the assumption that only by understanding the dynamic processes of accumulation and dispossession in pre-industrial South Africa can the complex origins of the contemporary racial order be fully understood. Its specific concern is the Transorangian interior in a particularly revealing period of social, economic arid political transition. In attempting to explain the origins and significance of the Boer republic founded in 1854, the paper explores the relationship between imperial expansionism and colonial capitalism; and it examines the emergence of ruling elites, the forms of accumulation they employed and the nascent state structures they relied on to support and legitimate their activities. A skeletal narrative section will follow, and then the issues that are raised there will be discussed and analysed in a concluding section. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries African Studies Institute;ISS 221
dc.subject Afrikaners en_US
dc.subject South Africa. History. 1836-1909 en_US
dc.title Sub-imperialism, primitive acculumation, and state formation: The making of a Boer Republic en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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